77 Followers
·
Follow

OpEd: The authors, ex-presidents of the UNGA, “welcome” a proposed roadmap to post-Covid-19 global recovery through strengthened multilateralism.

by María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés & Tijjani Muhammad-Bande. Read more on PassBlue.

Image for post
Image for post
The UN Day Concert, held on Oct. 22, 2020 in the General Assembly Hall, was prerecorded at La Scala Theater in Milan and featured, among others, Roberto Bolle, a ballet dancer, above. The authors, ex-presidents of the General Assembly, “welcome” a proposed roadmap to post-Covid-19 global recovery through strengthened multilateralism via the UN. MARK GARTEN/UN PHOTO

Since its founding 75 years ago, the United Nations has proven, with the support of its member countries and other partners, its worth in complex problem-solving. That includes preventing great-power wars, remedying humanitarian emergencies, safeguarding human rights and reducing extreme poverty. But as we commemorate UN Day, with world leaders having marked the world body’s first 75 years in September by adopting an action-oriented UN75 Declaration, the UN must still evolve.

That work begins with focusing on the coronavirus recovery, inequalities, the climate crisis and, perhaps most alarming, the rise of extreme nationalism. …


This Week @ The UN: highlights of the most important news on the world body.

by Dulcie Leimbach. Read more on PassBlue.

Image for post
Image for post
In Geneva, Stephanie Williams, the UN’s acting special envoy for Libya, announced a cease-fire agreement between the warring Libyan parties, effectively immediately, Oct. 23, 2020. UNSMIL

A “permanent” cease-fire is reached in Libya; Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City declines to meet with the president of the UN General Assembly; and what’s going on behind closed-door meetings at the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization.

Greetings from This Week @UN, highlights of the most important news on the world body. The information is drawn from the UN spokesperson’s briefings, our original reporting and other sources.

Check it out: our newest podcast episode tells you how many Nobel Peace Prizes have been awarded to the UN and features an original audio clip with David Beasley, the World Food Program chief, the day he got the news about his agency receiving the Nobel this year, while traveling in Africa. …


Op-Ed: As the 20th year of the 21st century ends, the answer to a collective, global “descent into cynicism, chaos and crisis” can be found in the UN, its Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

by Mona Ali Khalil. Read more on PassBlue.

Image for post
Image for post
A World War II veteran, above, attending the opening of a UN exhibition marking the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, Jan. 21, 2020. The essayist of this op-ed asserts that as the 20th year of the 21st century ends, the answer to our “descent into cynicism, chaos and crisis” can be found in the UN and its Charter and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. MARK GARTEN/UN PHOTO

By all accounts, 2020 has been a terrible year so far — but is it worse than 1920?

In 1920, World War I, which killed 16 million people, had just ended. The two-year influenza pandemic that followed killed 50 million more. In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic has already killed more than one million people and infected more than 40 million with infections surging worldwide.

With 20/20 hindsight, the 20th century was a terrible one. It heralded two world wars that together took more than 85 million lives. The collapse of the Ottoman Empire ushered in an era of British and French colonialism that led to deadly decolonization and national liberation battles in Latin America, Africa and Asia. It was a century of genocides — including the Holocaust in Europe — which was the worst and most remembered — as well as the Armenian genocide, the Russian pogroms, the Cambodian genocide, the Rwandan genocide and the Bosnian genocide. …

About

PassBlue

Independent Coverage the United Nations. A project of The New School’s Studley Graduate Program in International Affairs, supported by the Carnegie Corporation.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store